July 2004

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Volume 16 Issue 7
Mechanical complications of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) include rupture of the interventricular septum, papillary muscle or left ventricular free wall. These events constitute 4–24% of all complications. Ventricular free wall rupture is part…
Right ventricular myocardial infarction (RVI) is usually associated with inferior left ventricular involvement and leads to an increased in-hospital mortality rate.1 Rarely, an isolated RVI may occur. In these cases, electrocardiogram may show ST-seg…
Dear Readers, This issue of The Journal of Invasive Cardiology includes original research articles, expert commentary, case reports, and articles from the journal’s special sections “Clinical Decision Making,” “Acute Coronary Syndromes” and “Clini…
There are two principal approaches to achieve femoral artery hemostasis following diagnostic cardiac catheterization or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI): manual compression or arterial closure devices.1–6 Arterial closure devices are safe and…
Achieving hemostasis at the arteriotomy site after percutaneous coronary intervention has been discussed in The Journal of Invasive Cardiology previously.1–3 In this month’s Journal, Lasic et al.4 (see pages 356–358) compare the safety and efficacy o…
Contrast-induced nephropathy is a frequent cause of hospital-acquired acute or chronic renal insufficiency in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization.1,2 The increasingly frequent use of contrast-enhancing imaging for both diagnosis and intervent…
Intracoronary radiation, by virtue of its ability to inhibit intimal hyperplasia and constrictive vascular remodeling, reduces restenosis after percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Long lesions — longer than the available source length — have b…
Patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis have higher mortality compared to age and sex-matched controls in the general population.1-4 The risk of all cause death is increased 3.3 fold while the cardiovascular death is increased 5.7 fold.3…
Renal artery stenosis (RAS) remains a recognized contributor to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Initially, RAS, an infrequently diagnosed, curable cause of hypertension has become a more frequently diagnosed entity. While many of the younger in…
Case Report. We present the case of a 74-year-old male with a history of hypertension and smoking who was urgently referred for evaluation after he suffered a cardiac arrest after a transurethral prostate resection (TURP) in a community hospital with…