July 2003

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Volume 15 Issue 9
Coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) is an established form of revascularization, typically associated with improved survival. However, CABG has its own inherent deficiencies, including recurrent ischemia, venous graft failure and the need for…
Dear Readers, This issue of the Journal of Invasive Cardiology marks the beginning of a new home for the journal and for the editor-in-chief. Management of the journal will now be coordinated from the office of the Joint Cardiac Program of Sutter He…
Aortic dissection is a rare complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).1,9 It can be life-threatening and warrants immediate diagnosis and treatment, which may be conservative,1,3 surgical, or stenting.4–6,8,9 We describe a patient in w…
Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a common phenomenon, affecting approximately one-quarter of the normal healthy population. The prevalence of PFO in patients with ischemic stroke is significantly higher than in the normal population.1 Many patients with…
Percutaneous occlusion of the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) has been performed safely and effectively with different devices over the last years.1–6 Selection of the closure device is based on the anatomic configuration of the duct and its minimal d…
Common complications of permanent endocardial pacing systems include infection of the generator pocket, the wire track, increase in pacing threshold or complete exit block due to fibrosis at the myocardial contact site, dislocation or (rarely) intrav…
Coronary subclavian steal syndrome is a variant of subclavian steal syndrome. It consists of obstructive atherosclerotic disease of the proximal subclavian artery in the presence of a patent internal mammary artery that has been previously used as an…
Cardiogenic shock occurs in about 10% of hospitalized patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI).1 Despite the use of early reperfusion therapies with thrombolysis or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), the mortality in these patients rema…
Atrial septal defect (ASD) is one of the most common congenital cardiac anomalies encountered in adults.1 Surgical ASD closure leads to improved functional status, reduces the risk of progressive right-sided failure and prevents the development of se…
Since the initial description in the mid 1970s by King and Mills et al.1–3 of an atrial septal defect occluding device, a number of other devices have been studied, including: Rashkind’s devices (hooked and double umbrella), Clamshell occluder, butto…