July 2008

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Volume 20 Issue 7
Most obstructions in femoral artery are due to atherosclerotic occlusive disease. Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is most prevalent in the renal, carotid, and iliac arteries and its known cause of renal artery stenosis. FMD exists in multiple vascular…
Coronary perforation is an uncommon complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The reported incidence is approximately 0.4–1.2%.1 Coronary perforations are typically graded from 1 to 3, the latter representing a frank perforation with…
Arterial puncture and sheath placement in the subclavian artery is an infrequent complication of central venous access. The incidence of arterial puncture during subclavian vein access has been estimated at 2.7–4.9%; it is probably higher in critical…
Dear Readers, This issue of the Journal of Invasive Cardiology continues our series of special focus sections to provide a more detailed examination of important topics in cardiovascular medicine. This month’s focus is on the various uses of Cardiac…
Cardiac computed tomography (CT) really arrived on the cardiology scene at the dawn of the 21st century. Though much important work on cardiac CT had been taking place for years before that time, the publication of a few key articles documenting the…
Coronary stents dislodged or embolized prior to complete expansion in the target vessel may be retrieved with special devices such as snares, baskets and embolization protection devices.1,2 Rare cases of partially expanded or fractured stents extract…
Percutaneous coronary intervention of bifurcation lesions is associated with lower procedural success rates and an increased incidence of subsequent major adverse cardiac events and restenosis.1,2 Several reasons may be offered. The implantation of a…
Cardiogenic shock is a devastating complication of acute myocardial infarction (MI) with an in-hospital mortality between 40–76%.1,2 Cardiogenic shock from right ventricular infarction is uncommon, though it has a mortality rate equal to that of left…
Coronary arteries are usually located on the surface of the cardiac muscle. Myocardial bridges have been described in a variable number of autopsy cases ranging from 5.4% to 85.7% of cases examined, depending on the population sampled.1,2 In contrast…
Case Presentation. Although left ventricular (LV) pseudoaneurysm is seen infrequently, it should be recognized and distinguished from the common type of left ventricular aneurysm. The diagnosis can be difficult and the lesions are prone to rupture, t…