April 2008

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Volume 20 Issue 4
_______________________________________________ J INVASIVE CARDIOL 2008;20:E129-E132 Percutaneous treatment of coronary chronic total occlusions (CTO) remains one of the major challenges in interventional cardiology. Although CTO in the form of in-…
_______________________________________________ J INVASIVE CARDIOL 2008;20:E133-E135 The management of coronary disease in patients with spinal or intracranial disease may be challenging. In some cases, coronary lesions may require treatment before…
_______________________________________________ J INVASIVE CARDIOL 2008;20:E136-E137 Coronary collateral vessels are able to supply blood to a myocardial territory vascularized by severely stenosed or occluded epicardial arteries. They may contribu…
_______________________________________________ J INVASIVE CARDIOL 2008;20:E109-E113 Stroke is the third leading cause of mortality in the developed world.1 The incidence of first-ever strokes was > 731,000 in 1996 in the United States alone.2…
_______________________________________________ J INVASIVE CARDIOL 2008;20:E114-E119 Mitral stenosis (MS) is still frequent in many countries where rheumatic fever remains endemic.1–2 In Western countries, since the disappearance of rheumatic fev…
_______________________________________________ J INVASIVE CARDIOL 2008;20:E120-E123 Stent thrombosis (ST) is an important, life-threatening complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary stent placement that has been assoc…
_______________________________________________ J INVASIVE CARDIOL 2008;20:E124-E125 An infrequent, but potentially lethal, complication after aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the occurrence of iatrogenic coronary ostial stenosis. This complicatio…
_______________________________________________ J INVASIVE CARDIOL 2008;20:E126-E128 Technique. Percutaneous transmitral commissurotomy (PTMC) was first described by Inoue et al in 1984 as an alternative to surgical closed mitral commissurotomy fo…
Percutaneous closure of atrial septal defects (ASDs) is a safe procedure and has been routinely performed in many centers around the world as an alternative to surgical closure.1–5 However, in elderly patients with ASD, prolonged left-to-right shunt…
Atrial septal defects (ASD), which comprise roughly 10% of all congenital cardiac disease, are frequently first encountered in the adult population.1 Significant shunting results in the insidious development of symptoms, culminating in overt heart fa…