August 2007

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Volume 19 Issue 8
 Case report. A 65-year-old female with a history of repeated episodes of syncope was admitted for permanent pacemaker implantation due to sick sinus syndrome. A 9 Fr peel-away sheath, which is devoid of a hemostatic valve, was inserted. During ventr…
I read with interest the innovative procedure of percutaneous transvalvular endomyocardial cryoablation for the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy reported by Keane et al1 in the June 2007 issue of the Journal of Invasive Cardiology. Their disa…
Dear Readers, This issue of the Journal of Invasive Cardiology includes original research articles, a review, “Clinical Images”, and online case reports. These case reports can be found on our web site (www.invasivecardiology. com). I encourage you t…
Coronary and peripheral interventions can result in distal embolization. Although guidelines mandate the use of embolic protection devices (EPDs) in PCI of vein grafts1 and carotid arteries,2,3 these devices are at most 50% effective4 and suffer from…
Chronic renal disease (CRD) is a common health concern in wealthy countries, with approximately 20 million American adults currently affected.1 While the association between renal insufficiency and increased risk of adverse non-fatal and fatal cardio…
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is endemic in our population, as is cardiovascular disease. Both carry large risks of major morbidity and mortality. The interaction of these two conditions is complex and the addition of CKD to cardiovascular disease wor…
The intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) is the most commonly used temporary cardiac assist device. It has immediate beneficial hemodynamic effects, augmenting coronary perfusion, increasing myocardial oxygen supply and decreasing myocardial oxygen deman…
The intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) is a mechanical unloading device that is used to decrease myocardial oxygen demand while at the same time increasing cardiac output.1–3 In patients with acute MI who present with cardiogenic shock intra-aortic bal…
The radial artery approach to diagnostic cardiac catheterization has emerged as an attractive alternative to the femoral artery approach in recent years, especially in Canada and Europe, due to more familiarity and training.1,2 In experienced hands,…
The current study of Oleg Roussanov et al describes the cost-effectiveness of the radial approach to diagnostic catheterization compared with the femoral approach, with and without use of closure devices.1 Despite the fact that this is a non-randomiz…