February 2007

|
Volume 19 Issue 2
The choice of anticoagulant in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been the subject of intense investigation over the past decade. Ever since anticoagulation with heparin was observed to be an essential treatment in patie…
Coronary stenting has demonstrated a consistent ability to reduce restenosis rates compared with percutaneous “plain old” balloon catheter angioplasty. However, in-stent restenosis has long remained the major limitation of coronary stenting. Recent r…
Left main (LM) trifurcation coronary stenting is a challenging and complex percutaneous procedure that has been reported in small series and case reports.1–5 Typically, this disease is treated surgically, but with the advent of drug-eluting stents (D…
Percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary angiography are increasingly performed via radial artery access after resurrection of this route by Campeau in 1989.1 The reasons for this are reduced local complication rates compared to procedures usi…
Temperature heterogeneity due to inflammatory activity may have a pivotal role in predicting plaque composition and allow differentiation between stable and unstable atherosclerotic plaques. Plaques prone to rupture1 are associated with greater macro…
The majority of acute coronary syndromes are the result of nonobstructive coronary plaque rupture and subsequent thrombosis. The structure of these plaques, rather than their size, is the major determinant of plaque vulnerability. Identifying vulnera…
No-reflow is a common complication during percutaneous coronary intervention in degenerated saphenous vein grafts (SVGs), and is associated with serious adverse clinical outcomes.1–6 The important role of microvascular vasoconstriction as a predomina…