September 2006

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Volume 18 Issue 9
Coronary arteries originating from a single coronary ostium (CO) in the aorta, in the absence of congenital heart disease (CHD), are rare.1 In several large series, the incidence ranged from 0.024% to 0.066%.2–4 In 1979, Lipton et al proposed a class…
Case Report. A 51-year-old male was referred to our center because a fractured 9 Fr sheath, 7 cm long, inserted in the right vena jugularis interna migrated to the right ventricle. Both ends of the broken sheath impinged against the tricuspid chordal…
Reported success rates of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) of chronic total occlusions (CTO) range from approximately 60–75%,1–3 and are much lower when compared with PCI of nontotal occlusions.4,5 When combined with specialized equipment, s…
The percutaneous radial artery approach for coronary angiography (CAG) was first reported in 1989–19991 and subsequently transradial coronary angioplasty was reported in 1995 by Kiemeneij et al.2 The advantages of the radial artery approach are numer…
Coronary stent placement is the most commonly employed technique for percutaneous treatment of atherosclerotic heart disease. It accounts for about 75% of the procedures performed worldwide.1 In comparison to conventional balloon angioplasty, stents…
Attempts to reduce neointimal proliferation following coronary artery stent implantation have focused on stent coatings with or without local drug delivery. Polymers provide some unique features, which determine their use as coating material: (1) the…
Ideally, cardiologists would like a stent that is easy to deliver, causes no acute thrombosis, provides insignificant late loss due to intimal hyperplasia and offers no risk of late thrombosis should antiplatelet therapy have to be withdrawn. Drug-e…
Treatment with drug-eluting stents (DES) has revolutionized percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) due to their substantial efficacy in reducing restenosis and the need for repeat revascularization procedures. Despite this benefit, the delivery of…
Randomized clinical trials evaluating coronary stents versus balloon angioplasty have demonstrated marked improvements in the short- and long-term safety and efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) by reducing restenosis and the need for…
Urgent coronary reperfusion unequivocally saves lives in the setting of acute coronary syndromes, however for most patients, the goal of percutaneous coronary intervention remains the control of anginal symptoms.1,2 As a standalone procedure, balloon…