August 2006

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Volume 18 Issue 8
A growing body of evidence suggests a prognostic and symptomatic benefit of reopening coronary chronic total occlusions (CTOs).1 However, percutaneous revascularization of CTOs remains a challenge for the interventional cardiologist. The main limitat…
In-stent restenosis is the result of neointimal hyperplasia that, by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging, typically has a homogeneous, echoreflective appearance. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses of “typical” in-stent neointimal hyper…
Percutaneous intervention of coronary ostial stenoses carries a lower procedural success rate and a higher likelihood of acute complication and need for repeat revascularization. Technical challenges related to the treatment of ostial side branches i…
Aortic stenosis (AS) is commonly encountered by cardiologists. Assessment of AS is routinely performed with Doppler echocardiography, but cardiac catheterization has an important role in the assessment of patients with inconclusive echocardiographic…
Bae et al describe the use of a pressure wire in conjunction with a 5–6 Fr guiding catheter to measure transvalvular gradients in 18 patients with aortic stenosis.1 The method is clearly technically feasible, and correlated well with echocardiographi…
Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a frequent finding in young patients with cryptogenic stroke.1–4 PFO has also been related to migraine,5 platypnea-orthodoxia syndrome (condition in which shortness of breath and hypoxemia occur when upright and resolve…
In this issue of the Journal of Invasive Cardiology, Alaeddini et al report on the incidence of atrial tachyarrhythmias (AT) in their series of 71 patients who had closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) performed for cryptogenic stroke or orthodeoxi…
Recent randomized trials have established that patients who present with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (MI) may be managed with low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) followed by early angiography and by appropriat…