February 2005

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Volume 17 Issue 2
In response to: W.C. Kang, et al, Vol. 16, No. 12, pp. 725–726 Successful Management of a Resistant, Focal Calcified Lesion Following Direct Coronary Stenting with a Cutting Balloon I would like to commend Kang, et al for their innovative approach d…
Dear Readers, This issue of the Journal of Invasive Cardiology includes original research articles, case reports and reports with brief reviews, as well as articles from our special sections Interventional Pediatric Cardiology, Electrophysiology Cor…
Recent studies have demonstrated that in the setting of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), with either intractable symptoms, acute left ventricular failure, acute mitral regurgitation, cardiac enzyme rise or electrocardiogram (ECG) change, percutaneous c…
Intraoperative stent placement under direct vision as a means of relieving pulmonary artery stenosis is an attractive alternative to complex surgical reconstruction or a valid option in patients with a limited vascular access.1,2 We describe here the…
Post-traumatic ventricular septal defect (VSD) after penetrating cardiac trauma is infrequent, with an estimated incidence of 1–4.5% of cases.1,3 The decision to close a traumatic VSD is similar to that of a non-traumatic VSD and is based on the degr…
Coronary artery occlusion during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) causes regional myocardial ischemia. There are few reports or experimental studies about new onset of transient acute mitral regurgitation (MR) during PCI. However, there were…
Bifurcation coronary lesions remain challenging for interventional cardiologists. Before coronary stents were widely used, the rate of success of percutaneous revascularization was low and the procedure was fraught with complications and restenosis.1…
In-stent restenosis (ISR) often limits the long-term success of percutaneous coronary intervention. A number of clinical trials have shown that drug-eluting stents are both safe and effective in preventing ISR in de novo lesions.1,2,3 The use of drug…
The use of rotational atherectomy to ablate part of a metallic stent has been very limited, mainly because there are a small number of candidates for this type of procedure,1–7 but probably also because of the concern regarding the size and fate of t…
In 1929, in an attempt to find a safe way to inject drugs for cardiac resuscitation, a young surgical resident named Werner Forssmann inserted a catheter in his antecubital vein, positioning the catheter into the right atrium of the heart. He documen…