January 2005

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Volume 17 Issue 1
This prospective observational study examines the use of sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) for the treatment of atherosclerotic ostial lesions.1 Ostial lesions that involve the junction of the aorta and the origin of the right coronary artery, left main…
Coronary interventions of non-aorto ostial stenoses remain a challenging task with a high rate of procedural complications and restenosis. The lack of efficacy of conventional balloon angioplasty in non-aorto ostial coronary intervention has been att…
Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on thrombus-containing lesions represents a clinical challenge to the interventional cardiologist, since thrombus has been identified as a predictor of adverse outcome.1,2 While attempting to reestablish coron…
Percutaneous treatment of patients with a visible intracoronary thrombus has been recognized as a procedure associated with higher risk for complications. For patients with intracoronary thrombus in the stent era, the potentially worse outcome associ…
Although primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been proven to be superior to thrombolytic therapy for the treatment of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI),1–3 the latter approach is still widely practiced due to reasons su…
Clopidogrel is an oral antiplatelet agent which selectively and irreversibly inhibits the platelet adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) receptor. Antiplatelet effect is synergistic when administered with aspirin. Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and…
Despite several studies showing an advantage of early treatment with clopidogrel in the patient presenting with acute coronary syndrome, or prior to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI),1–6 this treatment is frequently not given early enough to a…
Ostial atherosclerotic lesions constitute a distinct substrate for percutaneous interventions, as they differ from the other lesion sites in management strategies and in clinical outcomes. Since the lesions are more likely fibrotic and calcific, lesi…