January 2003

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Volume 15 Issue 2
John Anderson: In the U.S. and in Australia, stroke is the third leading cause of death and the leading cause of disability. Yet despite this, there is an air of therapeutic nihilism about stroke. Patients who present to the emergency room with a str…
Richard Myler: I have always believed that you don’t read history, you repeat it. You may never have heard about Richard Schneider who was the chief of Werner Forsmann in Germany. In 1929, a 24-year-old man who worked with Schneider had the idea to c…
Dear Readers, This issue of the Journal of Invasive Cardiology begins another exciting year for the publication of the Journal and includes original research articles, case reports, reviews, articles from the Journal special sections “The Electrophy…
QT dispersion (QTD), the difference between the maximum and minimum QT interval on the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), is a marker of heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization.1 Previous studies have shown increased QTD to be a predictor of advers…
Extensive thrombus in native coronary arteries is relatively rare. Percutaneous revascularization of thrombus-containing lesions has an increased incidence of adverse events, such as abrupt vessel closure and myocardial infarction. The two approaches…
Left main coronary artery (LMCA) disease is found in 3–5% of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization for ischemic chest pain, congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock.1 Revascularization by coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has been sho…
Chronic total occlusion (CTO) is always a challenge to the interventional cardiologist. The successful recanalization rate is only about 50–70%.1–5 Guidewires always prefer to go to the channel that has the lowest resistance. As a consequence, select…
The incidence of major anomalies of the coronary artery is 0.3–0.8% of the population undergoing coronary angiography.1 There are only a few cases in the literature describing successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to the anomalous coron…
Non-specific aorto-arteritis (NSAA) results in stenosing, occlusive and dilatational or aneurysmal lesions involving the aorta, its major branches and the pulmonary arteries in varying combinations and extent.1 Percutaneous balloon angioplasty became…
In the last decade, coronary stenting has evolved from a bailout procedure following balloon angioplasty into an elective strategy for the treatment of all lesions located in vessels with an angiographic reference diameter larger than 3.0 mm.1,2 The…