September 2002

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Volume 14 Issue 9
“Facilitated fibrinolysis”: GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors and fibrinolytic therapy in ST-elevation infarction. Considering the abundant platelet-rich thrombus present in almost all patients with acute myocardial infarction, it is intuitive that platelet inh…
Uncertainties with Drug-Eluting Stents Percutaneous coronary revascularization is a worldwide accepted technique as part of the treatment of coronary artery disease. Despite the use of stents, restenosis continues to be the major limitation of this…
Dear Readers, This issue of the Journal of Invasive Cardiology includes original research articles, case reports, and articles from the Journal special sections “Acute Coronary Syndromes”, “Clinical Decision Making”, “The Electrophysiology Corner” a…
Acute myocardial infarction may occur alone or, less frequently, associated with other medical conditions, such as intestinal hemorrhage, trauma, vascular operation and more rarely cerebral hemorrhage.1 We describe a case of a patient in which a myoc…
Overview. Against the background of established clinical benefit in non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and elective percutaneous revascularization, recent trials examining the role of glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa inhibition in acut…
Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) by conventional balloon is the primary technique used for percutaneous coronary revascularization. However, restenosis after successful coronary balloon angioplasty remains a problem. Although neo…
The recent article in this issue of the Journal of Invasive Cardiology by Kawaguchi et al. continues to stimulate my fascination with cutting balloon angioplasty. I can remember when we first started using the cutting balloon on an investigational ba…
Since its introduction in 1984 by Inoue et al.,1 percutaneous mitral balloon valvuloplasty (PMBV) has been accepted as an effective procedure for the treatment of severe mitral stenosis with immediate and short-term results comparable to those of sur…
QT dispersion (QTD) has been proposed as an indicator of risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) in different clinical settings (long QT syndrome,2,3 congestive heart failure4 and post-myocardial infarction5–9). However, a major limitation in the…
Closure of the small to moderate sized patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is accomplished at most large pediatric heart centers by transcatheter techniques, most often by inserting thrombogenic fabric-stranded Gianturco coils. However, closure of the lar…