August 2002

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Volume 14 Issue 8
Renal artery stenosis (RAS) can result in renovascular hypertension and nephrosclerosis and accounts for 1–2% of all cases of hypertension.1 Treatment includes medical therapy, balloon angioplasty and surgical bypass of the renal artery. Percutaneous…
Coronary aneurysms are defined as a localized dilatation that exceeds 1.5 times the diameter of the adjacent segment of artery. Aneurysms can be saccular (transverse larger than the longitudinal axis) or fusiform (longitudinal at least twice the tran…
Myocardial infarction is a rare complication that can occur immediately after a blunt chest trauma. We report a 36-year-old male who experienced a fatal anterolateral myocardial infarction after a nonpenetrating chest injury sustained in a car accide…
Dislodgement and embolization of coronary stents before deployment are rare and challenging complications of intracoronary stenting. Reported incidence varies between 0.56–0.90%.1,2 Intracoronary embolization may cause arterial occlusion with potenti…
Unfractionated heparin (UFH) has been the anticoagulant of choice for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) since the procedure’s inception, although few data exist regarding the optimal extent of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) or of…
Coronary stenting is established as a common technique to improve outcomes of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and to reduce incidence of emergency coronary artery bypass grafting after PTCA.1 The standard coronary stent implanta…
The most useful attribute of stents is their ability to scaffold the artery, thereby repairing dissections and preventing arterial recoil, with beneficial effects upon the incidence of acute closure1 and restenosis.2 “Coil” stents are less effective…