July 2002

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Volume 14 Issue 7
In-stent restenosis (ISR) has become a major clinical problem. The rate of ISR is 7–37% of patients who undergo stent implantation and is dependent on patient characteristics, lesion morphology, and procedural technique.1 The recurrence rate after tr…
The scope of percutaneous vascular intervention has expanded over the past two decades. Angioplasty is now the procedure of choice for peripheral vascular diseases, including those of the renal arteries. Endoluminal stent graft and covered stents are…
Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is a known complication of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of atrial fibrillation foci.1 Although balloon dilation has been reported to effectively treat PVS following RFA,2,3 restenosis has also been reported.4 We report…
Stent thrombosis represents an infrequent but potentially grave complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). With current antithrombotic regimens, stent thrombosis occurs after fewer than 1% of stent-based interventions,1,2 but may be mo…
Howard Cohen: What routine pharmacologic therapy are you currently using in your lab for patients with acute myocardial infarction? Do you use anything in a routine fashion, or do you restore blood flow and see what happens? Are you routinely using I…
The primary pathophysiologic mechanism for myocardial ischemia secondary to ACS or as an acute complication of PCI is thrombotic occlusion of a coronary artery in response to vascular injury.1 Endothelial denudation caused by disruption or erosion of…