June 2002

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Volume 14 Issue 6
Management of bleeding at the femoral vascular access site following percutaneous catheterization is of paramount importance. Traditionally, manual or mechanical compression has been the standard approach to achieve hemostasis. Prior to this clinical…
Intracoronary stents have been a major milestone in interventional cardiology ever since two large, randomized trials1,2 documented that they reduced restenosis and repeat revascularization rates and increased event-free survival at 6 months. Recent…
In comparison to conventional balloon dilatation, intracoronary stents reduce the rate of restenoses and peri-interventional complications for specific vessel segments and in vessels with a diameter of > 3 mm. The lower rate of restenoses after st…
In-stent restenosis (ISR) is the most important limitation to current percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) practice. Intimal hyperplasia has been well defined as the principal mechanism involved in recurrence after stent implantation. Although se…
Intracoronary calcium channel blockers have been administered during percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) for the management of reduced coronary flow due to microvascular dysfunction.1–3 More recent studies have shown that intracoronary calcium…
In the current issue of the Journal, Michaels et al.1 provide convincing evidence that the prophylactic administration of verapamil prior to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of saphenous vein grafts See Michaels et al. on pages 299–302 red…
Even though myocardial infarction during pregnancy is a rare occurrence, it is associated with a 37–50% mortality rate.1 Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in pregnancy was first described by Katz in 1922 and has a reported incidence of 1 in 10,000 pr…
As many of you may know, the field of Invasive Cardiology experienced a huge loss on May 6th, 2002. Dr. Thomas Linnemeier, a member of our editorial board and a long-time close personal friend and colleague of mine, was fatally injured in an automobi…
There is considerable variety in size and position of the coronary arteries.1 The incidence of coronary anomaly in one of the largest series (126,595 cases) was reported to range between 0.6–1.3%.2 The majority of these were reported to be anomalies…
Identification of the coronary endoluminal lesion(s) responsible for the process now called acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has become a central focus of both non-invasive and invasive treatment modalities in patients with coronary heart disease. Impre…