May 2002

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Volume 14 Issue 5
In last month’s issue of the Journal, we published Part I of this article. This month’s conclusion focuses on other risk stratification models and tools. Several major studies have established the benefit of glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa inhibitors in…
The benefit of platelet inhibition during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been known for some time.1 In recent years, the interest has focused on the platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors, which block the final common pathway of plat…
Coronary artery aneurysm (CAA) is an uncommon condition with a natural history and prognosis still obscure.1 Aneurysmal coronary artery disease is defined as coronary dilatation that exceeds the diameter of the adjacent reference vessel by 1.5 times…
Pseudoaneurysms are encapsulated hematomas that communicate with an artery because of an incomplete seal by the media. Although femoral artery pseudo-aneurysms occurring as a complication of cardiac catheterization are familiar to an interventionist,…
There are many reports in the literature about coronary artery aneurysms, their incidence, pathogenesis, clinical outcome and treatment.1–3 If asymptomatic, their progression, rupture or secondary embolization are unpredictable. Some aneurysms are re…
The idea of achieving an optimal stent deployment is a simple one: a stent deployed in a lesion has to reach its nominal size which should be close to the measured vessel size, taking into account that the plaque is still there and that the adventiti…
Dear Readers, This issue of the Journal of Invasive Cardiology includes original research articles, a special teaching collection on catheter treatments for aneurysms, articles from four of the Journal special sections, and a case report. In the…
The introduction of stents in clinical practice resulted in a reduction of the restenosis rate from 30–40% to 16–27% and a target lesion revascularization (TLR) rate of 6–15% after 6 months, although angio-guided stent implantation often resulted in…