December 2001

|
Volume 13 Issue 12
Anomalous origin of the coronary arteries is uncommon. Angiographic studies have found a prevalence of such a congenital anomaly in 0.6–1.3% of cases.1,2 Single coronary artery arising from the right sinus of Valsalva is even less common, occurring i…
Syncope is responsible for 5% of emergency department visits and 1% of hospital admissions.1 Syncopal episodes are often too infrequent and unpredictable for detection with conventional ambulatory monitoring techniques. Electrophysiologic testing is…
Case Description. A 41-year-old woman was admitted with the diagnosis of atrial flutter/fibrillation of two days for cardioversion. Her past medical history was remarkable for two operations to repair a secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) at the age…
Dear Readers, This issue of the Journal of Invasive Cardiology includes original research articles, commentaries, case reports, and articles from the Journal special sections "Clinical Decision Making" and "The Electrophysiology Corner". The first…
Diffuse, in-stent restenosis, characterized by lesions greater than 10 mm in length, is associated with revascularization rates ranging from 34% to more than 80% following conventional percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).1 Lesion lengths extendi…
Prolonged bedrest following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been rationalized to minimize the risk of vascular complications following femoral arterial puncture. This may not be a benign practice and can result in considerable patient di…
There are a number of reasons why early mobilization following coronary intervention is desirable. Patient comfort is obviously one reason, but limitations on health care resources increasingly drive this issue. A number of strategies have been enter…
Valvular stenosis due to rheumatic heart disease is still frequent in the country of Chile; when its course is not altered with adequate therapy, it usually carries a high morbidity and mortality rate.1–3 Rheumatic mitral stenosis primarily affects y…
The paper by Traverso and colleagues in this issue of the Journal tries valiantly to extract meaningful data from their retrospective look at a subset of their mitral valvuloplasty population. This study is similar to a number of See Traverso et al…
Recently, lower restenosis rates have been demonstrated by directional coronary atherectomy (DCA) followed by stenting compared to stenting alone.1 This strategy may be suitable for ostial lesions, which are associated with a high risk of acute compl…