Volume 14 - Issue 4 - April, 2002

Coil Closure of the Large Patent Arterial Duct: Cheap, But How Easy and Effective?

Ziyad M. Hijazi, MD, MPH

Coil occlusion has become an accepted alternative treatment for small to moderate sized patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Gianturco coils (Cook Cardiology, Inc., Bloomington, Indiana) are small, coiled spring wires with fabric strands woven into the springs. They are available in standard 0.035´´, 0.038´´ and 0.052´´ sizes. The accurate placement of coils in a PDA may be a challenging and frustrating task to the interventionalist, especially in the large ductus (>= 4 mm). Multiple alternative techniques for coil delivery have been devised to improve the success rate of ductus closure. Som...

Laser Angioplasty and Laser-Induced Thrombolysis in Revascularization of Anomalous Coronary Arteries

Rakesh Shah, MD, Robert E. Martin, MD, On Topaz, MD

Anomalous origin of the coronary arteries occurs in only 0.64–1.2% of patients undergoing coronary angiography.1,2 In symptomatic patients with atherosclerotic coronary disease, precise angiographic recognition of the origin and the anatomic course of a target anomalous coronary vessel is important for safe percutaneous revascularization or for coronary bypass surgery. Pulsed excimer laser (308 nm wavelength) is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved device for debulking and revascularization of complex coronary and peripheral atherosclerotic lesions in symptomatic patients.3–10 Rec...

The Journal of Invasive Cardiology April 2002 issue

Richard E. Shaw, PhD, FACC
Editor in Chief

Dear Readers,

This issue of the Journal of Invasive Cardiology includes several interesting articles. In the first research article, Dr. J. Richard Spears and collaborators from the Cardiovascular Research Laboratory, Wayne State University, TherOx Inc. in Irvine, California and Michigan State University present their preliminary study of aqueous oxygen hyperbaric reperfusion in a porcine model of myocardial infarction. They demonstrate that with their novel approach to catheter-delivered hyperbaric reperfusion of intracoronary aqueous oxygen, myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury can ...

Extensive Right Coronary Artery Dissection Following Cutting Balloon Treatment of In-Stent Restenosis

Giampaolo Niccoli, MD, William P. Orr, MD, Adrian P. Banning, MD

Case Description. A 44-year-old female was readmitted with chest pain on minimal exertion. She was an ex-smoker and had hypercholesterolemia. Eight months previously, she had experienced an episode of unstable angina and underwent coronary angiography, which demonstrated an essentially normal left coronary artery and a critical stenosis of the proximal right coronary artery. This was stented directly with a 3.5 x 15 mm NIR Royal stent (Boston Scientific/Scimed, Inc., Maple Grove, Minnesota). She was discharged on aspirin and clopidogrel for one month and was well until pain recurred three mont...

Risk Stratification in Patients with Unstable Angina and Non-ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction: Evidence-Based Review

Rami Doukky, MD and James E. Calvin, MD

Unstable angina (UA) and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) are closely related clinical syndromes; they are often undistinguishable at presentation, and often entail similar early diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Unstable angina is defined as: 1) angina that occurs at rest or with minimal exertion; 2) new onset angina (within one month) with Canadian Cardiovascular Society Classification III or IV in severity; or 3) worsening previously stable angina. First attempts in evaluating UA were directed toward ruling out myocardial infarction (MI).1–5 More modern approaches consid...

Extensive Right Coronary Artery Dissection Following Cutting Balloon Treatment of In-Stent Restenosis

Giampaolo Niccoli, MD, William P. Orr, MD, Adrian P. Banning, MD

Case Description. A 44-year-old female was readmitted with chest pain on minimal exertion. She was an ex-smoker and had hypercholesterolemia. Eight months previously, she had experienced an episode of unstable angina and underwent coronary angiography, which demonstrated an essentially normal left coronary artery and a critical stenosis of the proximal right coronary artery. This was stented directly with a 3.5 x 15 mm NIR Royal stent (Boston Scientific/Scimed, Inc., Maple Grove, Minnesota). She was discharged on aspirin and clopidogrel for one month and was well until pain recurred three mont...

Management of Dissection and Other Complications: Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection in a Young Woman Precipitated by R

Muthu Velusamy, MD, *Mark Fisherkeller, MD, *Michael E. Keenan, MD,
Robert C. Gallagher, MD, Francis J. Kiernan, MD, Daniel B. Fram, MD

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a relatively rare entity that has been associated with a high morbidity and mortality.1 Although a precise definition for SCAD has not been universally accepted,2 it has generally been defined as the occurrence of a coronary dissection in the absence of trauma, aortic dissection or iatrogenic causes such as coronary angiography or angioplasty.3,4 Cases of SCAD are often associated with one of several different clinical profiles and/or precipitating events. Most cases have been described in young, otherwise healthy women who are often pregnant or...

Late-Term Myocardial Infarction After Surgical Ligation of a Giant Coronary Artery Fistula

Steven L. Goldberg, MD, *Joel Manchester, MD, **Hillel Laks, MD, **Joseph Perloff, MD

Large coronary artery fistulae have been associated with complications such as congestive heart failure, myocardial ischemia, endocarditis, rupture and arrhythmias.1 To reduce the risk of complications, large coronary artery fistulae are often treated with surgical ligation or percutaneous device closure. Because this is an uncommon malformation, there is little information on outcomes after interventions, and there may be under-reporting of late-term complications. We report a case of recurrent myocardial infarction occurring after successful surgical closure of a giant coronary artery fistul...

Management of Dissection and Other Complications – Spontaneous Dissection of Bilateral Internal Mammary Arterial Grafts

Ahmad Qaddour, MD and Chanwit Roongsritong, MD

Arterial graft dissection is a rare complication of cardiac catheterization. Spontaneous dissection has not been previously described. We report a case of a 49-year-old male with quadruple bypass grafts who presented with acute myocardial infarction due to spontaneous dissection of both internal mammary artery grafts.

Case Report. A 49-year-old white male with 1-year status post-quadruple coronary artery bypass grafting, hypertension and hyperlipidemia presented to the Emergency Department with severe angina at rest. He was a current smoker but denied any drug use. His medications included ...

Editorial Staff
  • Executive Officer
    Laurie Gustafson
  • Production
    Elizabeth Vasil
  • National Account Manager
    Jeff Benson
  • Senior Account Director
    Carson McGarrity
  • Special Projects Editor
    Amanda Wright
Editorial Correspondence
Back to top